Doing the Dishes

The Wonderful Art of Giving

Giving is giving away, contributing, donating, … Parents have to love and provide education, recreation, housing, quality time, safety. Children, have to make an effort in school, do their homework, help at home, among other activities that while they are growing, they will be added into their daily routines.

When you love someone, you wish the best for him or her. You give to that important person the most valuable part of your soul, of your thoughts, of your time… You give yourself. As a matter of fact, the family as the base of the society should be the pioneer in the practice of the unconditional action of giving.

Some believe that mom and dad should always give. And in the meantime, children will only receive. If you are thinking this way, we can consider some aspects to understand that the wonderful art of giving in the family is a two-way deal, that is, back and forth. Giving in the family is not a dead end.

Giving is giving away, contributing, donating, … Parents have to love and provide education, recreation, housing, quality time, safety. Children, have to make an effort in school, do their homework, help at home, among other activities that while they are growing, they will be added into their daily routines.

Both, parents and children must understand that in the family, giving is a gift of love and not an act of obligation. It is not a duty, it is not a responsibility. It is given without expecting to receive. Furthermore, it is about loving and caring for each member of the family.

Receiving, on the other hand, is not sitting around waiting to be served. You receive because your family members care about you. They love you, think of you. The act of receiving is a gift for what you have already given. It is the fruit of the seed that you have sown.

In the two-way deal that I am referring to, there will be times when mom will have to give up sleep time to care for your youngest child; or the daughter will stop playing for a few minutes to help clean the bathroom. Dad will also stop working with the computer to help with the chores around the house, taking out the trash, tidying up the bed, or simply with the general maintenance of the garden.

Curiosities of the generous act of giving

  • At home, each member of the family must sow the seed of collaboration. Later, without waiting for it, you will receive its fruits.

  • In this business of giving, some people have “pleasure” in giving love, giving food, giving gifts. These people love to give more than to receive.

  • Among Christians, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, and members of other religions around the world, giving is more important than receiving.

  • Giving is a gift of love, never an act of duty.

How to cultivate the art of giving

  • Let's start with the husband teaching him little lessons of collaboration at home. Let's ask him to help us with certain routines around the house and clearly explain when and how we want him to do them.

  • Children will gradually be taught the art of giving and collaborating according to their age. Explain how you can do some chores around the house. A good place to learn is your room, collecting toys, sorting school supplies, folding your clothes. Give examples whenever necessary.

  • Be clear and state exactly, in simple words, what, how, and when you expect these activities to be done. Be patient, the first few times will not be as you expect or in the indicated time. A reminder will suffice to encourage them to give their contribution. Don't get discouraged or lose control.

  • Cultivate the art of giving whenever it is opportune, exalting, and thanking the contribution. A thank you for your help or your collaboration is very valuable, these are words that will undoubtedly motivate us to continue growing in the wonderful world of giving at home.

  • Comment that thanks to everyone's generous cooperation, the house is neat and clean. Mention, for example, that Mom was able to rest for a few minutes when she came back from work, that Dad played with the children, and then add the benefits: the children will be able to enjoy the park or that they will have time to visit grandparents on the weekend.

Many people frequently practice the generosity of giving to the needy, the hungry, the thirsty, and the helpless. Let's take the first step by instructing in our own home that giving is a two-way deal and that it is a gift of love and not an act of obligation.